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Ohio, Kentucky attorneys decline to prosecute people who seek, provide abortions

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More than 80 attorneys across the country are pledging not to press charges against patients or abortion providers.The petition comes days after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade, ending the national legalization of abortion that has been in place in the U.S. for almost 50 years.Read the full statement hereEighty-four attorneys, including the Cuyahoga County prosecutor and Columbus city attorney signed the petition. Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters did not sign the petition and released a statement saying “I was elected to enforce the laws of the state of Ohio. I took an oath that I would do just that.”Deters said it’s dangerous for prosecutors to pick and choose what laws to enforce.”When prosecutors do not follow their oath, it will promote lawlessness and challenge the Basic structures of separation of powers,” Deters said.The ACLU and Planned Parenthood filed a = lawsuit on Monday against the state of Kentucky on behalf of abortion clinics and a health care provider.The lawsuit wants a judge to stop a ban on abortions after six weeks.Cincinnati Mayor Aftab Pureval said Monday that he plans to fight the ruling on the local level and the city would continue to support women’s health options. “Cincinnati and its local government profoundly, unabashedly, and unequivocally support a woman’s right to choose,” said Mayor Pureval. “And we will do everything in our power to preserve that. To the thousands of women in our city who are terrified, frustrated, and angry right now I say this. You are not alone and Cincinnati is going to fight like hell for you.”The mayor laid out the steps he along with a majority of Council and Interim City Manager John Curp intend to take this week.According to a press release from his office, they involve “Repealing a 2001 ordinance restricting the City’s ability to cover elective abortions in its health plan. Upon repeal of the ordinance, the Administration will change the City’s health plan to include abortion-related services, to the extent allowable under Ohio law. The Administration will implement a travel reimbursement policy for the cost to travel for healthcare services that aren’t locally available and not covered by the City’s health plan.”Pureval said he wants to know by the end July how the city can ensure abortion is not a crime.

More than 80 attorneys across the country are pledging not to press charges against patients or abortion providers.

The petition comes days after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade, ending the national legalization of abortion that has been in place in the U.S. for almost 50 years.

Read the full statement here

Eighty-four attorneys, including the Cuyahoga County prosecutor and Columbus city attorney signed the petition.

Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters did not sign the petition and released a statement saying “I was elected to enforce the laws of the state of Ohio. I took an oath that I would do just that.”

Deters said it’s dangerous for prosecutors to pick and choose what laws to enforce.

“When prosecutors do not follow their oath, it will promote lawlessness and challenge the Basic structures of separation of powers,” Deters said.

The ACLU and Planned Parenthood filed a = lawsuit on Monday against the state of Kentucky on behalf of abortion clinics and a health care provider.

The lawsuit wants a judge to stop a ban on abortions after six weeks.

Cincinnati Mayor Aftab Pureval said Monday that he plans to fight the ruling on the local level and the city would continue to support women’s health options.

“Cincinnati and its local government profoundly, unabashedly, and unequivocally support a woman’s right to choose,” said Mayor Pureval. “And we will do everything in our power to preserve that. To the thousands of women in our city who are terrified, frustrated, and angry right now I say this. You are not alone and Cincinnati is going to fight like hell for you.”

The mayor laid out the steps he along with a majority of Council and Interim City Manager John Curp intend to take this week.

According to a press release from his office, they involve “Repealing a 2001 ordinance restricting the City’s ability to cover elective abortions in its health plan. Upon repeal of the ordinance, the Administration will change the City’s health plan to include abortion-related services, to the extent allowable under Ohio law. The Administration will implement a travel reimbursement policy for the cost to travel for healthcare services that aren’t locally available and not covered by the City’s health plan.”

Pureval said he wants to know by the end July how the city can ensure abortion is not a crime.



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